Anita Hoge: Common Core testing measures attitude, not aptitude

Anita Hoge explains how the Common Core testing is not meant to measure aptitude but designed to measure attitude. Once this measurement is assessed then the objective is to provide curriculum to a district, a school or even class that is adjusted to change a student’s attitude to one the Government desires.

 

4 Responses to Anita Hoge: Common Core testing measures attitude, not aptitude

  • Common Core Scares Me says:

    I think what she is referring to is the fact that Common Core bypasses all normal checks and balances; i.e. school boards, state governments etc, so there really is no way to get it out of place once it is in place. It appears that by taking the “Recovery Act” and “Race to the Top” monies, States locked themselves in because guess what? No state is going to try and fight implementation. If they did, the Federal Govt would come in and demand repayment of those grants. What state can afford to do that? The money was spent in every state LONG before it was received. So now, they are trapped and no school board or superintendent or PTA can do anything about it.

    That is just my take but I’m by no means trying to put words in her mouth. If anyone wants to correct me I’m open to it.

  • Boky says:

    At 6:06 of Anita Hodge’s video that you posted, you can hear this:
    A WORD ABOUT ATTITUDES
    HERE: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED103468.pdf
    Attitudes, beliefs, values, etc., are abstractions. Nevertheless they are real enough to each individual holding them. They are typically thought of as a state of readiness a predisposition to act or react in a certain way when faced with certain situations. A person’s attitudes are always present but remain dormant most of the time. They are expressed in speech or other behavior only when the object of the attitude is perceived. A person may have strong attitudes for or against astrology but actively express them only when some issue connected with astrology arises or when confronted by an attitude scale ! Attitudes are often reinforced by beliefs (the cognitive component) and attract strong feelings (the emotional component) that will lead to particular behaviors (the action tendency component).

    The measurement of attitudes always involves making inferences. Since the attitudes cannot be seen or measured directly, we must infer their pretense from consistencies that appear in the individual’s behavior. Observing individuals across time in everyday situations is probably the best way to learn how the individual thinks, feels and acts.

    Clearly, this method is much too cumbersome and costly when we want to investigate the intensity and direction of attitudes for a large number of people, forcing us to rely instead on verbal reports of the individuals concerned.

    From this document: AUTHOR Russell, Nolan F.
    TITLE Getting Inside the EQA Inventory: Grade 8.
    HERE: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED103468.pdf

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